Author: Jayme Smith

Hemingway Voyant Project

Whoever coined the term, “A man of few words”, could have been describing Hemingway. Famous for his short stories, Hemingway’s writing seems simplistic in nature but is often very symbolic. For instance one of his most famous short stories “Hills Like White Elephants” is just a few pages long and the central conflict is never even mentioned. It’s only through… Read more →

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Death in Flashbacks

Though Hemingway’s writing style can seem a bit cold and removed, many of his short stories focus on great adventures and romances. Yet notably these exiting deeds are generally over before Hemingway chooses to start his story. Although we rarely get glimpses into the minds of his characters, Hemingway does offer some flashbacks in his story in order to orient… Read more →

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Ambiguity in Hemingway

  Hemingway writes about post-war life and disillusionment with the world. His short stories, however, often involve inner conflicts and friction between two people. In most of his stories, his characters have trouble with their relationships. In two of his short stories, “The Sea Change” and “Hills like White Elephants”, Hemingway creates a scene filled with little background knowledge or… Read more →

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Duffy’s Defense of Women

             In the first collection of poems, dubbed “Selling Manhattan”, Duffy’s poems largely focused on internal reflection and she played around with form and language. She would interject small phrases into the verses which would reflect the thoughts of the protagonist of the poem. In her second collection, “World’s Wife”, Duffy takes fairy tales, myths,… Read more →

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Carol Ann Duffy: “All Days Lost Days”

If there’s one thing I cannot call Duffy’s poetry, it’s happy. In fact, I can’t think of a single poem in “Selling Manhattan” that I walked away from without even a twinge of sadness. However, although her poems may cover darker themes, that doesn’t mean I didn’t like them. The sensitive and subtle way she approached such subject as death,… Read more →

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Duffy’s Poems

         Although I’ve only read the first 35 pages of her collection of poems called “Selling Manhattan”, I was struck by the melancholia of her poems. From “Homesick” to “The Dummy” to “The Brink of Shrieks”, Duffy’s poems took themes such as death and abuse and told them from unusual perspectives and in fragmented language. Two poems… Read more →

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